homework help 36317

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<object:standard:lacc.rl910.4>Imagery is

 the way a writer uses language that appeals to senses.

 the use of personification to get the reader to think.

 the sound that alliteration makes with “S” or “Sh.”

 the repeated use of rhyme over more than two lines.

Question 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 10 points)

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Imagine you are writing a poem about a talented football player. Which of the following phrases uses the appropriate connotation?

 Gently calling

 Lumbering by

 Zipping past

 Mistaking all

Question 3 (Multiple Choice Worth 10 points)

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Read the following poem and answer the question that follows.

“O Captain! my Captain!” by Walt Whitman

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;

The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;

The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,

While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:

But O heart! heart! heart!

O the bleeding drops of red,

Where on the deck my Captain lies,

Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;

Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;

For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a—crowding;

For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;

Here Captain! dear father!

This arm beneath your head;

It is some dream that on the deck,

You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;

My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;

The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;

From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;

Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!

But I, with mournful tread,

Walk the deck my Captain lies,

Fallen cold and dead.

What connotation does the poet use for the word in bold?

 Fury

 Romance

 Misery

 Celebration

Question 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 10 points)

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Writers who use imagery

 are using the senses to get audiences to visualize

 must describe either fire or water in great detail

 rarely become considered “great” writers over time

 usually do so because they do not like figurative language

Question 5 (Multiple Choice Worth 10 points)

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Read the following poem and answer the question that follows.

“I Like to See It Lap the Miles” by Emily Dickinson

I like to see it lap the miles,

And lick the valleys up,

And stop to feed itself at tanks;

And then, prodigious, step

Around a pile of mountains,

And, supercilious, peer

In shanties by the sides of roads;

And then a quarry pare

To fit its sides, and crawl between,

Complaining all the while

In horrid, hooting stanza;

Then chase itself down hill

And neigh like Boanerges;

Then, punctual as a star,

Stop—docile and omnipotent—

At its own stable door.

This poem describes a train as if it were a horse. Examine the imagery of the stanza in bold. What does it describe?

 The rumbling a train makes as it passes by

 The smell of train tracks after a train has gone

 The sound a train makes as it blows its horn

 The feeling of being on a train for a vacation

Question 6 (Multiple Choice Worth 10 points)

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Read the following poem and answer the question that follows.

“I Like to See it Lap the Miles” by Emily Dickinson

I like to see it lap the miles,

And lick the valleys up,

And stop to feed itself at tanks;

And then, prodigious, step

Around a pile of mountains,

And, supercilious, peer

In shanties by the sides of roads;

And then a quarry pare

To fit its sides, and crawl between,

Complaining all the while

In horrid, hooting stanza;

Then chase itself down hill

And neigh like Boanerges;

Then, punctual as a star,

Stop—docile and omnipotent—

At its own stable door. 

This poem describes a train as if it were a horse. Which lines uses imagery to describe the train arriving at the station for the night?

 “And stop to feed itself at tanks”

 “At its own stable door.”

 “Complaining all the while”

 “Then, punctual as a star,”

Question 7 (Multiple Choice Worth 10 points)

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Read the following poem and answer the question that follows.

“O Captain! my Captain!” by Walt Whitman

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;

The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;

The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,

While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:

But O heart! heart! heart!

O the bleeding drops of red,

Where on the deck my Captain lies,

Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;

Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;

For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a—crowding;

For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;

Here Captain! dear father!

This arm beneath your head;

It is some dream that on the deck,

You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;

My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;

The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;

From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;

Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!

But I, with mournful tread,

Walk the deck my Captain lies,

Fallen cold and dead.

Examine the imagery in the stanza in bold. What is the significance of the two different images?

 The speaker does not feel the joy everyone else is experiencing.

 The speaker does not feel the misery everyone else is experiencing.

 The speaker does not want anyone to know how unhappy he truly is.

 The speaker does not want anyone to know how happy he truly is.

Question 8 (Multiple Choice Worth 10 points)

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Read the following poem and answer the question that follows.

“Fame is a Bee,” by Emily Dickinson

Fame is a bee,

It has a song—

It has a sting—

Ah, too, it has a wing.

Of what literary device is this poem an example?

 Extended metaphor

 Onomatopoeia

 Extended simile

 Apostrophe

Question 9 (Essay Worth 10 points)

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Read the following poem and answer the question that follows.

“Fame is a Bee,” by Emily Dickinson

Fame is a bee,

It has a song—

It has a sting—

Ah, too, it has a wing.

In one paragraph of at least three to five sentences, analyze the tone and imagery used in the line in bold. Identify the mood the author intended to create with this imagery, as well as the connotations used in the words “Ah” and “wing.” Use proper spelling and grammar.

Question 10 (Essay Worth 10 points)

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O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;

The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;

The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,

While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:

But O heart! heart! heart!

O the bleeding drops of red,

Where on the deck my Captain lies,

Fallen cold and dead.

Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;

For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a—crowding;

For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;

Here Captain! dear father!

This arm beneath your head;

It is some dream that on the deck,

You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;

My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;

The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;

From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;

Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!

But I, with mournful tread,

Walk the deck my Captain lies,

Fallen cold and dead.

In one paragraph of at least three to five sentences, analyze the imagery in the stanza in bold. Identify the mood the author intended to create with this imagery, as well as the connotations used in the diction. Use proper spelling and grammar.

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